Short answer: Better on average than Los Angeles (2015), Culver City (2011), and many other cities, same as Santa Monica and Beverly Hills

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The Pavement Condition Index (PCI) is a standard measure of the condition of a street on a 100-point scale. A brand new street would be a 100. The more cracks, potholes, and other faults, the lower the score.

The chart below shows the average PCI for West Hollywood and nearby cities. Some numbers are more recent than others. You can see the number and year for each city by hovering over or touching its bar.

Sources: “Report: Glendale Paving Management System,” Glendale City Council agenda item, March 10, 2015; City of Santa Monica website; City of West Hollywood budgets; KPCC website (for Los Angeles’s 2015 PCI); California Statewide Local Streets and Roads Needs Assessment, February, 2011, sponsored by California League of Cities et al. (for the county average). Note: Another source, the City of Los Angeles’ open data website, also has PCI scores for some of these cities (describing them as “recent” as of 2014). The PCI reported for Beverly Hills is slightly lower (77 versus 80) and the one for Culver City is much lower (54 versus 67).

We can see that:

  • The streets of Santa Monica, West Hollywood, and Beverly Hills are in roughly the same condition. Their recent PCI scores were 82, 81, and 80, respectively. Their average street could be labeled “B+,” “very good,” or “satisfactory.” Glendale’s PCI was a little lower at 75, but still in this category.
  • The state’s average PCI was 66 in 2012. The score for the county as a whole was almost the same (67 in 2011). A street like that might be called “C+” or “fair.”
  • The streets of Culver City, Burbank, and Pasadena were in average condition, with scores of 67, 66, and 66, respectively.
  • The City of Los Angeles’s average PCI was a bit lower (62). LA’s average street could be labeled “C” or “fair.” We know from city and press reports that LA’s PCI has been stable for eight years. As of 2008, non-residential streets were in better shape (65) than residential streets (59).


Has the condition of West Hollywood streets changed?

West Hollywood has maintained a high PCI for the past five years at least. In 2013 and 2014, the score of 87 put the city’s streets in the highest category. An 87 could translate into “A-,” “very good,” or “good.” The average PCI dropped back down to 81 in 2015.

Source: City of West Hollywood budgets


How rare is the condition of West Hollywood streets?

West Hollywood’s 2015 PCI was 81. As a city average, 81 is rare. We don’t have current numbers for every city in LA County, but a list from 2007 shows only 5% of them with a PCI of 81 or above. If we look at the Bay Area in 2014, only five cities out of 101 had a PCI of 81 or better, according to the Metropolitan Transportation Commission. San Francisco’s PCI was 66.

It’s even rarer for older cities without newly built streets. Three of the five Bay Area cities with PCIs of 81 or above were fast-growing cities that probably had new streets. The city with the highest PCI (87), had grown 550% since 1990.


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Short answer: Better on average than Los Angeles (2015), Culver City (2011), and many other cities, same as Santa Monica and Beverly Hills| The Pavement Condition Index (PCI) is a standard measure of the condition of a street on a 100-point scale. A brand new street would be a...